Malcolm IV 'the Maiden' of Scotland, King of Scotland

M, #102871, b. 20 March 1141/42, d. 9 December 1165
Last Edited=19 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.01%
     Malcolm IV 'the Maiden' of Scotland, King of Scotland was born on 20 March 1141/42.1 He was the son of Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne. He died on 9 December 1165 at age 23 at Jedburgh Castle, Scotland, unmarried.1 He was buried at Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.1
     He was crowned King of Scotland on 24 May 1153 at Scone Abbey, Scone, Perthshire, Scotland. He succeeded to the title of King Malcolm IV of Scotland on 24 May 1153.1
     He succeeded David I, his grandfather, when he was only about 12 years old. Also granted the English title of the Earl of Huntingdon in return for reliquishing the English conquests made by his grandfather. Died aged 23, probably due to excessive fasting, a sign of his religious zeal. He was perhaps the last Gaelic speaking monarch and did not marry although he left a natural son. Succeeded by his brother, William I of Scotland.

Child of Malcolm IV 'the Maiden' of Scotland, King of Scotland

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 196. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S323] Sir James Balfour Paul, The Scots Peerage: founded on Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's The Peerage of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland: David Douglas, 1904), volume 1, page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Scots Peerage.

William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland1

M, #102872, b. circa 1143, d. 4 December 1214
Last Edited=19 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.01%
     William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland was born circa 1143.2 He was the son of Henry of Huntingdon, Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne.3 He married Ermengarde de Beaumont, daughter of Richard I de Beaumont, Vicomte de Beaumont and Luce de l'Aigle, on 5 September 1186 at Woodstock Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.4 He died on 4 December 1214 at Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland.5 He was buried at Arbroath Abbey, Scotland.5
     He gained the title of Earl of Huntingdon. He succeeded to the title of Earl of Northumberland on 12 June 1152.2 He abdicated as Earl of Northumberland in 1157.2 He succeeded to the title of King William I of Scotland on 9 December 1165.2 He was crowned King of Scotland on 24 December 1165 at Scone Abbey, Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.2
     He succeeded his older brother, Malcolm IV. William fought to regain Northumberland from England, beginning the 'Auld Alliance' with France, but was captured at Alnwick and forced to acknowledge Henry II as Scotland's overlord in 1174.. He bought back Scotland's sovereignty from Richard I for #6600 (1189) towards the Third Crusade and in 1192 won long-canvased papel recognition of the Scotish Church's independence under Rome. His reign of almost 49 years was the longest in Scottish history. A strong and popular king. He was buried at Tironensian Abbey, Arbroath. Succeeded by his son, Alexander II.

Child of William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland and unknown daughter de Hythus

Children of William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland

Child of William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland and unknown daughter Avenal

Children of William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland and Ermengarde de Beaumont

Citations

  1. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 196. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S323] Sir James Balfour Paul, The Scots Peerage: founded on Wood's edition of Sir Robert Douglas's The Peerage of Scotland (Edinburgh, Scotland: David Douglas, 1904), volume 1, page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Scots Peerage.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 197.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 198.
  6. [S323] Sir James Balfour Paul, The Scots Peerage, volume 1, page 5.

Henry Beaumont, 1st Earl of Buchan1

M, #102873, d. before 10 March 1339/40
Last Edited=29 Jan 2013
Consanguinity Index=0.07%
     Henry Beaumont, 1st Earl of Buchan was the son of Louis de Brienne and Agnes, Vicomtesse de Beaumont.2 He married Alice Comyn, daughter of Sir Alexander Comyn and Joan Latimer, before 14 July 1310.3 He died before 10 March 1339/40.3 His will was probated in January 1342 at Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.3
     He fought in the Scottish Wars in 1302, with King Edward I.2 He was invested as a Knight before 1308.3 He held the office of Joint Warden of Scotland (south of Forth) in 1308.2 In 1307/8 he was granted large estates in Lincolnshire.2 He was created 1st Lord Beaumont [England by writ] on 4 March 1308/9.3 He held the office of Lordship of the Isle of Man between 16 March 1310 and 20 October 1312.3 He held the office of Envoy to France between 1312 and 1331.4 In 1312/13 he had livery of lands from John Comyn, Earl of Buchan.3 He fought in the Battle of Bannockburn on 24 June 1314.5 He held the office of Constable of England in 1322.3 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) in 1322.3 He fought in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1321/22.3 On 5 June 1323 he was imprisoned for contempt and disobedience at the Council.3 In 1334 he received a grant of Loughborough Castle, for siding against the King and preventing the King's escape.3 He was created 1st Earl of Buchan [England by writ] on 22 January 1333/34.2 He held the office of Constable of England in 1336.3 He held the office of Justiciar [Scotland] in 1338.3
     His descendants appear not to have used the title of Earl of Buchan.3

Children of Henry Beaumont, 1st Earl of Buchan and Alice Comyn

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 340. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 59.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 60.
  4. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 227. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  5. [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 77. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 307.
  7. [S8] BP1999. [S8]

Mary de Coucy1

F, #102874
Last Edited=15 Sep 2008
     Mary de Coucy was the daughter of Enguerrand III, Lord de Coucy and Mary de Montmirel-en-Brie.2 She married, firstly, Alexander II 'the Peaceful', King of Scotland, son of William I 'the Lion', King of Scotland and Ermengarde de Beaumont, on 15 May 1239 at Roxburgh, Scotland.2 She married, secondly, Jean de Brienne, son of Maud de Brienne, in 1257.3 She died, without issue by her second husband.1 She was buried at Newbottle, Scotland.2

Child of Mary de Coucy and Alexander II 'the Peaceful', King of Scotland

Citations

  1. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 227. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 199. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 12. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Margaret of Scotland, Princess of Scotland1

F, #102875, b. 28 February 1260/61, d. 9 April 1283
Last Edited=19 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.27%
     Margaret of Scotland, Princess of Scotland was born on 28 February 1260/61 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.2 She was the daughter of Alexander III 'the Glorius', King of Scotland and Margaret of England, Princess of England. She married Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway, son of Magnus VI Haakonsson, King of Norway and Ingeborg Eriksdottir, Princess of Denmark, circa 31 August 1281 at Bergen, Norway.2 She died on 9 April 1283 at age 22 at Tönsberg, Norway, in childbirth.2 She was buried at Christ Kirk, Bergen, Norway.2

Child of Margaret of Scotland, Princess of Scotland and Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway

Citations

  1. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 200. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.


Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway1

M, #102876, b. 1268, d. 15 July 1299
Last Edited=19 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.0%
     Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway was born in 1268.2 He was the son of Magnus VI Haakonsson, King of Norway and Ingeborg Eriksdottir, Princess of Denmark.3 He married Margaret of Scotland, Princess of Scotland, daughter of Alexander III 'the Glorius', King of Scotland and Margaret of England, Princess of England, circa 31 August 1281 at Bergen, Norway.4 He married Isabella Bruce, daughter of Sir Robert le Brus, 1st Lord Brus and Margaret, Countess of Carrick, before 25 September 1293.2 He died on 15 July 1299.
      Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway also went by the nick-name of Eirik 'the Priest Hater'.1 He succeeded to the title of King Eirik II of Norway in 1280.3

Child of Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway and Margaret of Scotland, Princess of Scotland

Child of Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway and Isabella Bruce

Citations

  1. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 147. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 207. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 24. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 200.

Margaret 'Maid of Norway' Eriksdottir, Queen of Scotland1

F, #102877, b. before 9 April 1283, d. circa 26 September 1290
Last Edited=19 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.11%
     Margaret 'Maid of Norway' Eriksdottir, Queen of Scotland was born before 9 April 1283 at Tönsberg, Norway.1 She was the daughter of Eirik II Magnusson, King of Norway and Margaret of Scotland, Princess of Scotland. She died circa 26 September 1290 from drowning while en-route to Scotland, in the North Sea.1 She was buried at Bergen, Norway.1
     She succeeded to the title of Queen Margaret of Scotland on 19 March 1286.1

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 201. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.

Ralph Hauselyn1

M, #102878
Last Edited=9 Feb 2004

Child of Ralph Hauselyn

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 417. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Alba1

M, #102879, b. circa 1001, d. 14 August 1040
Last Edited=22 Jul 2012
     Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Alba was born circa 1001.2 He was the son of Crínáin of Dunkeld, Mormaer of Atholl and Bethoc of Alba.3 He married Sybilla (?), daughter of Siward Digera, Earl of Northumberland and Elfleda (?), circa 1030.4 He died on 14 August 1040 at Pitgaveny, Elgin, Morayshire, Scotland, killed by a blow from Macbeth.5 He was buried at Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.5
     He was also known as Donnchad mac Crínáin.1 He gained the title of King Duncan of Strathclyde in 1018.4,6 He succeeded to the title of King Duncan I of Alba on 25 November 1034.4

Children of Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Alba and Sybilla (?)

Citations

  1. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 179. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 180.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 181.
  6. [S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 13. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]

Sybilla (?)

F, #102880
Last Edited=22 Jul 2012
     Sybilla (?) is the daughter of Siward Digera, Earl of Northumberland and Elfleda (?).1 She married Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Alba, son of Crínáin of Dunkeld, Mormaer of Atholl and Bethoc of Alba, circa 1030.1
     She was also known as Ælflæd.

Children of Sybilla (?) and Duncan I 'the Gracious', King of Alba

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 180. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.