Edward III, King of England1

M, #101871, b. 13 November 1312, d. 21 June 1377
Last Edited=24 Jan 2013
Consanguinity Index=2.03%
King Edward III of England
Effigy in Westminster Abbey 2
     Edward III, King of England was born on 13 November 1312 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.3 He was the son of Edward II, King of England and Isabelle de France.4 He married Philippe d'Avesnes, daughter of Guillaume V (III) d'Avesnes, Comte de Hainaut et Graaf van Holland en Zeeland and Jeanne de Valois, on 24 January 1328 at York Minster, York, Yorkshire, England.5 He died on 21 June 1377 at age 64 at Sheen Palace, Surrey, England, from a stroke.6 He was buried at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.6
     He was created 1st Earl of Chester [England] on 24 November 1312.7 He gained the title of Comte de Ponthieu et Montreuil [France] on 2 September 1325.5 He was created Duc d'Aquitaine [France] on 10 September 1325.8 He gained the title of King Edward III of England on 25 January 1327.9 He was crowned King of England on 1 February 1328 at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England, and styled 'Rex Angliae, Dominus Hiberniae et Dux Aquitaniae.9' On 20 October 1330 he assumed personal rule over England, after overthrowing the Regents, his mother and Roger Mortimer.5 In January 1340 he claimed the title of King of France, which started the Hundred Years War.5
     Edward's reign lasted 50 years. He was only 14 on his accession to the throne and the country was ruled by his mother Isabella and her lover Robert Mortimer. When he was 17 Edward took control and had Mortimer hanged and his mother imprisoned. He organised a professional army including trained long bow archers. In 1340 the English Navy beat the French thus winning control of the Channel and in 1346 he sailed with his son the Black Prince to start the 100 Years War in France. On Monday evening on 26 August 1346 he fought a French army three times the size of his at Crecy and the battle raged through the night into the next day. The French were annihilated and Edward followed this by laying siege to Calais and taking the town within 12 months. Gunpowder was used for the first time in this campaign but the real winner was the English long bow. At home, the Black Death raged and about 500,000 to 800,000 people died in England. On 19 Sept 1356 the Black Prince and his brother John of Gaunt slaughtered a French army twice their size at Poitiers. Under Edward, the House of Commons was developed as a means of raising taxes. Among institutions, justices of the peace were so titled in 1360, and Edward founded the Order of the Garter (1348). His parliaments were first divided into Lords and Commons (1332) and became fixed at Westminster, using English from 1362. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.10
     

Children of Edward III, King of England and Alice Perrers

Children of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes

Citations

  1. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogies Website.
  2. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 91. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  4. [S45] Marcellus Donald R. von Redlich, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, volume I (1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002), page 64. Hereinafter cited as Pedigrees of Emperor Charlemagne, I.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 92.
  6. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 115.
  7. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 171. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 172.
  9. [S4] C.F.J. Hankinson, editor, DeBretts Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage, 147th year (London, U.K.: Odhams Press, 1949), page 20 . Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1949.
  10. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995). Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.
  11. [S105] Brain Tompsett, Royal Genealogical Data, online http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/genealogy/royal/. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogical Data.
  12. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 69.
  13. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 257.
  14. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 113.
  15. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 357.

Philippe d'Avesnes1

F, #101872, b. 24 June 1311, d. 15 August 1369
Last Edited=6 Feb 2014
Consanguinity Index=0.47%
     Philippe d'Avesnes was born on 24 June 1311 at Bergen, Belgium.2 She was the daughter of Guillaume V (III) d'Avesnes, Comte de Hainaut et Graaf van Holland en Zeeland and Jeanne de Valois.3,4 She married Edward III, King of England, son of Edward II, King of England and Isabelle de France, on 24 January 1328 at York Minster, York, Yorkshire, England.4 She died on 15 August 1369 at age 58 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England, from a dropsy-like illness.4 She was buried at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.4

Children of Philippe d'Avesnes and Edward III, King of England

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), Volume XII/2, page 895. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3268] Hans Harmsen, "re: Chester Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 21 August 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Chester Family."
  3. [S45] Marcellus Donald R. von Redlich, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, volume I (1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002), page 64. Hereinafter cited as Pedigrees of Emperor Charlemagne, I.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 92. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  5. [S105] Brain Tompsett, Royal Genealogical Data, online http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/genealogy/royal/. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogical Data.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 69.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 257.
  8. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 113.

Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales1

M, #101873, b. 15 June 1330, d. 8 June 1376
Last Edited=24 Jan 2013
Consanguinity Index=2.76%
     Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales was born on 15 June 1330 at Woodstock Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.2 He was the son of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes. He married Joan of Kent, Countess of Kent, daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret Wake, Baroness Wake, on 10 October 1361.3 He died on 8 June 1376 at age 45 at Palace of Westminster, Westminster, London, England.3 He was buried at Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England.3
      Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales also went by the nick-name of 'the Black Prince'.1 He was created 1st Earl of Chester [England] on 18 March 1333.3 On 2 December 1333 he received a grant of Carisbrooke Castle and manors in the Isle of Wight.1 He was created 1st Duke of Cornwall [England] on 3 March 1337.3 He was created Prince of Wales on 12 May 1343.3 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) in 1348.3 He was created Prince of Aquitaine [England] on 19 July 1362.3,4 He was created Lord of Biscay and Castro Urdiales [Castille] on 23 September 1366.3 He abdicated as Prince of Acquitaine before 28 December 1375.3

Children of Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales

Child of Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales and Edith de Willesford

Children of Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales and Joan of Kent, Countess of Kent

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 172. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 92. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 93.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 183.
  5. [S105] Brain Tompsett, Royal Genealogical Data, online http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/genealogy/royal/. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogical Data.
  6. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 94.
  7. [S37] BP2003 volume 3, page 4023. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 173.

Isabella of England1

F, #101874, b. 16 June 1332, d. between 17 June 1382 and 5 October 1382
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=2.76%
     Isabella of England was born on 16 June 1332 at Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.1 Shewas also reported to have been born circa March 1332 at Woodstock Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.2 She was the daughter of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes.1 She married Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Sire de Coucy, son of Enguerrand VI de Coucy, Sire de Coucy and Katharina von Habsburg, on 27 July 1365 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.2 She died between 17 June 1382 and 5 October 1382 at London, England.2,3,4 She was buried at Grey Friars Church, Greenwich, London, England.2
      From 27 July 1365, her married name became de Coucy. As a result of her marriage, Isabella of England was styled as Countess of Bedford on 11 May 1366.1 She was invested as a Lady Companion, Order of the Garter (L.G.) in 1376.2

Children of Isabella of England and Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Sire de Coucy

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 69. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 94. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 70.
  4. [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 79. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.

Joan of England1

F, #101875, b. circa February 1335, d. 2 September 1348
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=2.76%
     Joan of England was born circa February 1335 at Woodstock Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.1 She was the daughter of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes. She died on 2 September 1348 at Loremo, Bordeaux, France, from the bubonic plague.1 She was buried at Loremo, Bordeaux, France.1
     She was also known as Joanna of England.

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 94. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.


William of Hatfield1

M, #101876, b. before 16 February 1337, d. before 3 March 1337
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=2.76%
     William of Hatfield was born before 16 February 1337 at Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England.2 He was the son of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes. He died before 3 March 1337 at Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England.2 He was also reported to have died before 8 July 1337 at York Minster, York, Yorkshire, England. He was buried at York Minster, York, Yorkshire, England.2

Citations

  1. [S105] Brain Tompsett, Royal Genealogical Data, online http://www3.dcs.hull.ac.uk/genealogy/royal/. Hereinafter cited as Royal Genealogical Data.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 94. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.

Simon de Dammartin, Comte de Ponthieu et Aumale1

M, #101877, d. 21 September 1239
Last Edited=13 Jan 2003
     Simon de Dammartin, Comte de Ponthieu et Aumale was the son of Alberic II de Dammartin, Comte de Dammartin and Maud (?). He married Marie de Ponthieu, daughter of William III Talvas, Comte de Ponthieu and Alys Capet, before September 1208. He died on 21 September 1239.
     He gained the title of Comte de Ponthieu. He gained the title of Comte d'Aumale.2

Child of Simon de Dammartin, Comte de Ponthieu et Aumale and Marie de Ponthieu

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 81. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 47. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster1

M, #101878, b. March 1340, d. 3 February 1399
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=2.76%
John of Gaunt 2
     John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster was born in March 1340 at St. Bavon's Abbey, Ghent, Belgium.3 He was the son of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes. He married, firstly, Blanche of Lancaster, Countess of Derby, daughter of Henry Grosmont of Derby Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Isabella de Beaumont, on 13 May 1359 at Reading Abbey, Reading, Berkshire, England. He married, secondly, Constanza de Castilla, Reina de Castilla, daughter of Pedro I, Rey de Castilla y León and Maria de Padilla, on 21 September 1371 at Roquefort, Gascogne, France.4 He married, thirdly, Katherine Roët, daughter of Sir Payne Roët, on 13 January 1396 at Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. He died on 3 February 1399 at age 58 at Leicester Castle, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.5 He was buried on 15 March 1399 at Old St. Paul's Cathedral, London, England.6
     He gained the title of Earl of Richmond on 20 September 1342.3 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) in April 1361.3 As a result of his marriage, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster was styled as Earl of Derby on 21 July 1361.3 As a result of his marriage, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster was styled as Earl of Lancaster before 14 August 1361.3 As a result of his marriage, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster was styled as Lord of Beaufort and Nogent on 14 August 1361.3 He succeeded to the title of Earl of Lincoln on 10 April 1362.3 He succeeded to the title of Earl of Leicester on 10 April 1362.3 He succeeded to the title of Earl of Derby on 10 April 1362.3 He gained the title of Duke of Lancaster on 13 November 1362.5 He gained the title of Lord de Bergerac et Roche-sur-Yon [France] on 8 October 1370.5 He and Katherine Roët were associated between 1371 and 1372.7 He abdicated as Earl of Richmond on 5 June 1372.5 As a result of his marriage, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster was styled as Rey John de Léon before 6 October 1372. As a result of his marriage, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster was styled as Rey John de Castilla before 6 October 1372.5 He was created Duke of Aquitaine [England] on 2 March 1390.5,8

Child of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Marie de St. Hilaire

Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Blanche of Lancaster, Countess of Derby

Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Katherine Roët

Children of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Constanza de Castilla, Reina de Castilla

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 908. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 98. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 101.
  5. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 99.
  6. [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.
  7. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 102.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 183.
  9. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 100.
  10. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 248.

Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York1

M, #101879, b. 5 June 1341, d. 1 August 1402
Last Edited=24 Jan 2013
Consanguinity Index=2.76%
     Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York was born on 5 June 1341 at King's Langley, Hertfordshire, England.1,2 He was the son of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes. He married Isabella de Castilla, daughter of Pedro I, Rey de Castilla y León and Maria de Padilla, between 1 March 1372 and 30 April 1372 at Hertford Castle, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England.1 He married Joan de Holand, daughter of Thomas de Holand, 2nd/5th Earl of Kent and Alice FitzAlan, circa 4 November 1393.3 He died on 1 August 1402 at age 61 at King's Langley, Hertfordshire, England.3 He was buried at Church of the Dominicans, King's Langley, Hertfordshire, England.3
      On 6 August 1347 he was granted all the lands beyond Trent late of his godfather, the Earl of Surrey.1 He fought in the campaign in France in 1359/60.4 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) circa April 1361.4 He was created 1st Earl of Cambridge [England] on 13 November 1362.4 He fought in the campaign in France between 1369 and 1371.4 He fought in the campaign in France between August 1372 and September 1375.4 He held the office of Warden of the Cinque Ports between 12 June 1376 and 1 February 1381.1 He held the office of Constable of Dover Castle between 12 June 1376 and 1 February 1381.1 He was Chief Commissioner for the defense of the Kentish coast against the French on 30 June 1377.4 He fought in the expedition against St. Malo in 1378.5 He was Chief Commissioner to treat with the ambassador of Bohemia concerning the King's marriage on 29 March 1381.5 He fought in the expedition in Portugal against the Spaniards in 1381/82, which he commanded without much success.5 In 1385 1st DUKE OF YORK of the created and 5th.6 He was created 1st Duke of York [England] on 6 August 1385.5 He held the office of Justice of Chester and county Flint on 28 September 1385.5 He was a member of the Council of Regency on 19 November 1386.5 He held the office of Keeper of the Bailiwick of the Forests of Rutland and Leighfield on 4 May 1388.5 He was Commissioner to treat for peace with France on 10 March 1393/94, along with Lancaster.5 He was Surveyor of the temporalities of the Archbishop of Canterbury on 5 August 1396.5 He held the office of Keeper of Mortagne-sur-la-Gironde on 24 February 1396/97.5 He held the office of Keeper of Freemantle Park, Hampshire on 12 May 1397.5 He held the office of Steward of England between 20 March 1399 and August 1399.7 On 27 July 1399 at Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England, he made his peace with the new King Henry IV, instead of opposing his landing.7 He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) in 1399.7

Children of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York and Isabella de Castilla

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), Volume XII/2, page 895. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 494, says 5 June 1344.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 899.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, Volume XII/2, page 896.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 897.
  6. [S37] BP2003 volume 3, page 4023. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 898.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 357.

Blanche de la Tour Plantagenet1

F, #101880, b. March 1342, d. March 1342
Last Edited=21 Jan 2011
Consanguinity Index=2.76%
     Blanche de la Tour Plantagenet was born in March 1342 at Tower of London, The City, London, England.1 She was the daughter of Edward III, King of England and Philippe d'Avesnes. She died in March 1342 at Tower of London, The City, London, England.1

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 112. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.