Lady Arabella Cavendish1

F, #105381, b. 19 August 1673, d. 4 June 1698
Last Edited=9 Mar 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.79%
     Lady Arabella Cavendish was born on 19 August 1673.1 She was the daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Frances Pierrepont.1 She married Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland, son of Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland and Lady Anne Digby, on 12 January 1694/95.1 She died on 4 June 1698 at age 24, from smallpox.1 She was buried on 10 June 1698 at Brington, Northamptonshire, EnglandG.1
     From 12 January 1695, her married name became Lady Spencer.1

Child of Lady Arabella Cavendish and Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S9] Charles Kidd and David Williamson, editor, DeBretts Peerage and Baronetage (London, U.K.: DeBrett's Peerage, 1999), volume 12, page 1870. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1999.

Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne1

M, #105382, b. 24 June 1630, d. 26 July 1691
Last Edited=4 Mar 2014
Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newvcastle-upon-Tyne
by Mary Beale, 1670 2
     Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne was born on 24 June 1630.4 He was the son of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Elizabeth Basset.5 He married Frances Pierrepont, daughter of Hon. William Pierrepont, circa 1652.4 He died on 26 July 1691 at age 61 at Welbeck Abbey, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, EnglandG, without surviving male issue.4
     He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Derbyshire in 1660.5 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Northumberland between 1661 and 1676.5 He was appointed Privy Counsellor (P.C.) between February 1670 and 1688/89.5 He succeeded as the 10th Baron Ogle on 25 December 1676. He succeeded as the 2nd Viscount Mansfield, co. Nottingham [E., 1620] on 25 December 1676.5 He succeeded as the 2nd Earl of Ogle, co. Northumberland [E., 1665] on 25 December 1676.5 He succeeded as the 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, co. Northumberland [E., 1665] on 25 December 1676.5 He succeeded as the 2nd Baron Cavendish of Bolsover, co. Derby [E., 1628] on 25 December 1676.5 He succeeded as the 2nd Marquess of Newcastle-on-Tyne [E., 1643] on 25 December 1676.5 He succeeded as the 2nd Earl of Newcastle-on-Tyne [E., 1628] on 25 December 1676.5 He was appointed Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) in 1677.5 He declined to take the oath of loyalty to William and Mary after the departure of King James II, and retired from public life after 1688.5 On his death all of his titles except the Barony of Ogle became extinct.5

Children of Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Frances Pierrepont

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S3609] Lia Keyes, "re: de Sousa Macedo Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 13 February 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: de Sousa Macedo Family."
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 527.
  5. [S37] BP2003 volume 1, page 1127. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 90.
  7. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 293.
  8. [S37] BP2003. [S37]

Frances Pierrepont1

F, #105383, d. 23 September 1695
Last Edited=29 May 2008
     Frances Pierrepont was the daughter of Hon. William Pierrepont.1 She married Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, son of William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Elizabeth Basset, circa 1652.2 She died on 23 September 1695 at London, EnglandG.3
     From circa 1652, her married name became Cavendish.

Children of Frances Pierrepont and Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 527.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 528.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 90.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 293.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume III, page 250.

Reverend Philip Chenevix1

M, #105384
Last Edited=29 Jan 2007
     Reverend Philip Chenevix was the pastor at Limay, Nantes, Bretagne, FranceG.1

Child of Reverend Philip Chenevix

Citations

  1. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), Chenvix, Richard. Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.

John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough1

M, #105385, b. 24 June 1650, d. 16 June 1722
Last Edited=4 May 2011
John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough
by Sir Godfrey Kneller 2
     John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough was born on 24 June 1650 at Ashe, Devon, EnglandG.3 He was the son of Sir Winston Churchill and Elizabeth Drake.3 He was baptised on 28 June 1650 at Axminster, Devon, EnglandG.3 He married Sarah Jenyns, daughter of Richard Jenyns and Frances Thornhurst, on 1 October 1678.4 He died on 16 June 1722 at age 71 at Cranbourne Lodge, Windsor, Berkshire, EnglandG, spms.5 He was buried on 9 August 1722 at Palace of Westminster, Westminster, London, EnglandG.5 His will (dated 19 March 1721/2) was proven (by probate) on 6 July 1722, "bequeathing as heirlooms at Blenheim the gold plate with the Elector of Hanover's arms engraved theron, and the diamond sword given to him by the Emperor".6 He was buried in 1744 at Chapel, Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, EnglandG, in accordance with his will.5
     He was educated at St. Paul's School, London, EnglandG.3 He gained the rank of officer in 1667 in the Army (Foot Guards).3 He held the office of Page of Honour to James, Duke of York in 1667.3 He and Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland were associated circa 1668.4 He fought in the campaign in Tangiers between 1668 and 1671.3 He fought in the campaigns in Flanders from 1672 to 1673, under the Duke of Monmouth.3 He held the office of Gentleman of the Bedchamber to James, Duke of York in 1673.3 He fought in the Battle of Enzheim in 1674, under the command of the French under Vicomte de Turenne.7 He held the office of Master of the Wardrobe in 1679.3 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Newtown, Isle of Wight between February 1679 and July 1679.3 He was created 1st Lord Churchill of Eyemouth, co. Berwick [Scotland] on 21 December 1682.8 He gained the rank of Colonel in 1683 in the Royal Dragoons.8 He held the office of Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company from 1683 to 1691.8 He gained the rank of Colonel in November 1683 in the Royal Regiment of Dragoons.8 He held the office of Ambassador to France from March 1685 to April 1685.8 He was created 1st Baron Churchill of Sandridge, co. Hertford [England] on 14 May 1685.8 He fought in the Battle of Sedgemoor in June 1685, where he defeated the rebels under the Duke of Monmouth.7 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General in 1688.8 On 24 November 1688 he was one of the first to desert the King, using his hatred of Popery as his excuse, supporting the accession of the Prince and Princess of Orange. Gibbs quotes Chesteron, "Churchill, as if to add something ideal to his imitation of Iscariot, went to James with wanton professions of love and loyalty, went forth in arms as if to defend the country from invasion, and then calmly handed over the country to the invader."8 He fought in the Battle of Walcourt in 1689, where his Dutch force defeated the French under Marshal d'Humerières.9 He held the office of Gentleman of the Bedchamber from 1689 to 1692.4 He was appointed Privy Counsellor (P.C.) on 14 February 1688/89.8 He was created 1st Earl of Marlborough, co. Wilts [England] on 9 April 1689.8 He gained the rank of commander in 1690 in the the English forces in the Netherlands.4 In 1692 he was dismissed from most of his posts, for well grounded suspicion of intrigues with the exciled King James II, as well as, according to Evelyn, for 'his excessive taking of bribes, covetousness, and extortion on all occasions, from his inferior officers.4' He held the office of Cabinet Minister in 1698.4 He held the office of Master of the Horse from 1698 to 1700.4 He gained the rank of Commander-in-Chief in June 1701 in the British and Dutch forces in the Netherlands.4 He held the office of Master General of the Ordnance in 1702.4 He held the office of Ambassador to The Hague in 1702.4 He gained the rank of Captain General in 1702 in the English forces at home and abroad, as well as Generalissmo of the Allied forces.4 He was appointed Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) on 14 March 1701/2.4 He was created 1st Marquess of Blandford [England] on 14 December 1702.4 He was created 1st Duke of Marlborough [England] on 14 December 1702.4 He fought in the Battle of Donauwerth on 2 June 1704 at Donauwörth, Bayern, GermanyG, against the Bavarians, whom he defeated.4 He fought in the Battle of Blenheim on 13 August 1704 at Blindheim, GermanyG, against the French, whom he soundly defeated.4 He was created Prince John of the Holy Roman Empire [Holy Roman Empire] on 28 August 1704, by Emperor Leopold.4 On 28 January 1704/5 he was granted the manor of Woodstock (about 22,000 acres), and the hundred of Wotton in Oxfordshire, where he subsequently built Blenheim Palace. The total cost of this Palace was £300,000, of which only £60,000 was spent by the Marlboroughs, with the balance from the Civil List.4 He fought in the Battle of Tirlemont on 18 July 1705 at TirlemontG.4 He was created Prince John of Mindleheim [Holy Roman Empire]| by the Emperor Joseph, which he subsequently exchanged in 1713 for the Principality of Mellenburg on 18 November 1705.4 He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Oxfordshire from 1706 to 1712.4 He fought in the Battle of Ramilles on 23 May 1706 at RamillesG.4 On 21 December 1706 he obtained an Act of Parliament to allow his title of Duke of Marlborough (and subsidiary titles) to descend through his four daughters to their male and female heirs.4 He fought in the Battle of Oudenarde on 11 July 1708 at Oudenaarde, BelgiumG.4 He fought in the Battle of Malplaquet on 11 September 1709 at MalplaquetG.4 He fought in the Battle of Arluex on 5 August 1711 at Arleux, FranceG.4 He fought in the Battle of Bouchain on 13 September 1711 at Bouchain, FranceG.4 On 30 December 1711 he was again dismissed from most of his offices, although with the accession of George II, he was restored to most them in 1714. Jesse writes, "a commission, appointed to examine into the public accounts, reported that among other evidences of corruption and abuse, there was full proof of the Duke having received in the shape of a bribe an annual present of £5,000 or £6,000 from the contractors of bread for the army."4 In 1713 he exchanged the Principality of Mindleheim in Swabia for the county of Mellenburg (then erected into a Principality) in Upper Austria.4
     Cockayne quotes Macky, "The Duke of York's love for [Arabella Churchill] his sister [by whom he was father of the Duke of Berwick and other children] first brought him to Court, and the beauty of his own person and his good address so gained on the Duchess of Cleveland [then mistress to Charles II] that she effectually established him there." Cockayne also claims, "he is said to have intrigued with the said Duchess and to have received large sums of money from her."8
     On his death, the Lordship of Churchill of Eyemouth became extinct. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.10
     

Children of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough and Sarah Jenyns

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 491.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 493.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 496.
  6. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volumeVIII, page 496.
  7. [S17] Kate Fleming, The Churchills (London, U.K.: George Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1975), page 23. Hereinafter cited as The Churchills.
  8. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 492.
  9. [S17] Kate Fleming, The Churchills, page 33.
  10. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), Churchill, John. Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.
  11. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 494.
  12. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 497.


Richard Jenyns1

M, #105386
Last Edited=3 Jun 2011
     Richard Jenyns is the son of unknown Jennings.2 He married Frances Thornhurst, daughter of Sir Gifford Thornhurst, 1st Bt. and Susanna Temple.
     He was also known as Richard Jennings.3 He lived at Sandridge, Hertfordshire, EnglandG.4

Children of Richard Jenyns and Frances Thornhurst

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S1401] Christopher Quaile, "re: Lord Bowen," e-mail message to Darryl Lundy. Hereinafter cited as "re: Lord Bowen."
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 428.
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume VIII, page 494.
  5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 117.
  6. [S3911] Frederick Appleby, "re: McKenna Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger LUNDY (101053), 13 August 2009 - 8 May 2010. Hereinafter cited as "re: McKenna Family."

Judith Tichborne1

F, #105387, b. circa 1702, d. 17 May 1749
Last Edited=16 Jan 2013
     Judith Tichborne was born circa 1702.2 She was the daughter of Benjamin Tichborne and Elizabeth Gibbs.1 She married, firstly, Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland, son of Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland and Lady Anne Digby, on 16 December 1717 [5 Dec 1717 O.S.].1 She married, secondly, Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Sutton, son of Robert Sutton, on 10 December 1724.2 She died on 17 May 1749 from a fever, after recovering from smallpox.2 She died on 17 May 1749.3 She was buried on 23 May 1749 at Brington, Northamptonshire, EnglandG.2 Her will was proven (by probate) on 1 June 1749.2
     After her marriage, Judith Tichborne was styled as Countess of Sunderland on 16 December 1717. After her marriage, Judith Tichborne was styled as Dowager Countess of Sunderland on 19 April 1722.4 From 10 December 1724, her married name became Lady Sutton.
     Cockayne states that "this third marriage greatly annoyed the Duchess of Marlborough. 'The relation of the young lady, whom he employed to make the proposition, did all he could to divert him from it, telling him freely that she was too young, not being much past fifteen, and of no experience as to family keeping or accounts, and no beauty, having somewhat of a squint look.' Elsewhere however, she is described as a 'very beautiful lady,' and Mrs. Delany says that 'she was very pretty, tall, and of a good figure, and very sensible and agreeable, though so shy and bashful that she by no means did herself justice.1' "

Children of Judith Tichborne and Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland

Child of Judith Tichborne and Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Sutton

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 489.
  3. [S37] BP2003 volume 3, page 3828. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
  4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 28.
  5. [S10] John Pearson, Blood Royal: The Story of the Spencers and the Royals (London, U.K.: HarperCollins, 1999), pages 67. Hereinafter cited as Blood Royal.
  6. [S9] Charles Kidd and David Williamson, editor, DeBretts Peerage and Baronetage (London, U.K.: DeBrett's Peerage, 1999), volume 12, page 1871. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1999.

Benjamin Tichborne1,2

M, #105388
Last Edited=27 Mar 2004
     Benjamin Tichborne is the son of Sir William Tichborne.1 He married Elizabeth Gibbs, daughter of Major Edward Gibbs.2

Child of Benjamin Tichborne and Elizabeth Gibbs

Child of Benjamin Tichborne and Elizabeth Gibbs

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S18] Matthew H.C.G., editor, Dictionary of National Biography on CD-ROM (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1995), reference "Pulteney, Daniel c.1684-1731". Hereinafter cited as Dictionary of National Biography.

Sir William Tichborne1,2

M, #105389, d. 12 March 1693
Last Edited=10 Sep 2011
     Sir William Tichborne was the son of Sir Henry Tichborne.3 He died on 12 March 1693.2

Children of Sir William Tichborne

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 534. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.
  3. [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume I, page 160. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.

Henry Tichborne, 1st and last Baron Ferrard of Beaulieu1

M, #105390, b. 1663, d. 1731
Last Edited=10 Sep 2011
     Henry Tichborne, 1st and last Baron Ferrard of Beaulieu was born in 1663.2 He was the son of Sir William Tichborne.1 He died in 1731.2
     He gained the title of 1st Baronet Tichborne. He was created 1st Baron Ferrard of Beaulieu [Ireland] in 1715.1

Child of Henry Tichborne, 1st and last Baron Ferrard of Beaulieu

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 488. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 534. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.
  3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 288.