Hercule François de Valois, Duc d'Alençon et Anjou1

M, #105251, b. 1554, d. 1584
Last Edited=3 Dec 2008
Consanguinity Index=0.04%
Hercule François, Duc d'Alençon et Anjou 2
     Hercule François de Valois, Duc d'Alençon et Anjou was born in 1554. He was the son of Henri II, Roi de France and Catherine de Medici. He died in 1584.1
     He gained the title of Duc d'Alençon. He gained the title of Duc d'Anjou.1

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 67. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.
  2. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.

Victoire de Valois

F, #105252, b. 1556
Last Edited=20 Jun 2010
Consanguinity Index=0.04%
Victorie de Valois 1
     Victoire de Valois was born in 1556. She was the daughter of Henri II, Roi de France and Catherine de Medici.

Citations

  1. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."

Jeanne de Valois

F, #105253, b. 1556
Last Edited=10 May 2003
Consanguinity Index=0.04%
     Jeanne de Valois was born in 1556. She was the daughter of Henri II, Roi de France and Catherine de Medici.

Charles de Valois, Duc d'Angoulême

M, #105254, b. 28 April 1573, d. 24 September 1650
Last Edited=16 May 2006
     Charles de Valois, Duc d'Angoulême was born illegitimately on 28 April 1573 at Château Faye, Dauphiné, France.1 He was the son of Charles IX, Roi de France and Marie Touchet.1 He married, firstly, Charlotte (?), daughter of Henri, Duc de Montmorency.1 He married, secondly, Françoise de Narbonne, daughter of Charles de Narbonne, Baron de Mareuil, in 1644.1 He died on 24 September 1650 at age 77.1
     He gained the rank of Colonel of Horse.1 He wrote the book Mémoires, from the assassination of Henri III to the Battle of Arques (1589-1593).1 He gained the title of Comte d'Auvergne.1 In 1601 he was imprisoned for several months after engaging in a conspiracy with the Ducs de Savoy, Biron and Bouillon to force King Henri IV to marry the Marquise de Verneuil.1 Between 1605 and 1616 he was imprisoned in the Bastille for intriguing with King Philp II of Spain.1 He gained the rank of Colonel-General of Horse in 1616.1 He gained the title of Duc d'Angoulême in 1619.1 He wrote the book Les Harangues, published 1620.1 He fought in the Siege of La Rochelle in 1627.1 He gained the rank of General in 1635 in the service of the French Army.1 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-General in 1636.1

Children of Charles de Valois, Duc d'Angoulême and Charlotte (?)

Citations

  1. [S1731] Fraser Crawford, "re: Charles de Valois," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 May 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Charles de Valois."

Françoise Marie de Bourbon1

F, #105255, b. 4 May 1677, d. 1 February 1749
Last Edited=2 Feb 2013
Françoise Marie de Bourbon
by Pierre Gobert 2
     Françoise Marie de Bourbon was born illegitimately on 4 May 1677 at Château de Maintenon, France.3 She was the daughter of Louis XIV, Roi de France and Françoise Athénaïs de Rochechouart.3 She married Philippe II d'Orléans, Duc d'Orléans, son of Philippe I, Duc d'Orléans and Elisabeth Charlotte Pfalzgräfin von Simmern, on 18 February 1692 at Versailles, Île-de-France, France.3 She died on 1 February 1749 at age 71 at Paris, France.4
     She was also known as Mademoiselle de Blois.3 In November 1681 she was legitimised.3

Children of Françoise Marie de Bourbon and Philippe II d'Orléans, Duc d'Orléans

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 69. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S36] Page 85. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S36]
  4. [S36] See. [S36]

Louise Françoise de Bourbon1

F, #105256, b. 1 June 1673, d. 16 June 1743
Last Edited=25 Oct 2011
Louise Françoise de Bourbom, Princesse de Condé
by François de Troy, 1688 2
     Louise Françoise de Bourbon was born illegitimately on 1 June 1673 at Tournay, France.1 She was the daughter of Louis XIV, Roi de France and Françoise Athénaïs de Rochechouart.1 She married Louis III de Bourbon, Prince de Condé, son of Henri Jules de Bourbon, Prince de Condé and Anne Henriette Julie Pfalzgräfin von Simmern, on 24 June 1685 at Versailles, Île-de-France, France.1 She died on 16 June 1743 at age 70 at Palais Borubon, Paris, France.1
     She was also known as Mademoiselle de Nantes.1 On 20 December 1673 her birth was legitimised.1

Children of Louise Françoise de Bourbon and Louis III de Bourbon, Prince de Condé

Citations

  1. [S36] Page 88. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S36]
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."


Louis Alexandre de Bourbon, Comte de Toulouse1

M, #105257, b. 6 June 1678, d. 1 December 1737
Last Edited=6 Dec 2009
Louis Alexandre de Bourbon
by Hyacinthe Riguad 2
     Louis Alexandre de Bourbon, Comte de Toulouse was born illegitimately on 6 June 1678 at Clagny, France.3 He was the son of Louis XIV, Roi de France and Françoise Athénaïs de Rochechouart.3,4 He married Marie Victoire Sophe de Noailles, daughter of Anne Jules de Noailles, Duc de Noailles and Marie Françoise de Bournonville, on 2 February 1723 at Paris, France.3 He died on 1 December 1737 at age 59 at Château de Rambouillet, Île-de-France, France.5,3
     He gained the title of Comte de Toulouse.3 In November 1681 his birth was legitimised.3 He gained the rank of Grand Admiral of France.3

Child of Louis Alexandre de Bourbon, Comte de Toulouse and Marie Victoire Sophe de Noailles

Citations

  1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 71. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S36] Page 88. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S36]
  4. [S36] See. [S36]
  5. [S16] Louda and MacLagan, Lines of Succession, table 71, says 1747.

Louise Elisabeth de Bourbon1

F, #105258, b. 14 August 1727, d. 6 December 1759
Last Edited=8 Jan 2009
Louise Elisabeth de Borbon, 1750 2
     Louise Elisabeth de Bourbon was born on 14 August 1727 at Versailles, Île-de-France, France.1 She was the daughter of Louis XV, Roi de France and Marie Charlotte Sophie Leszczynska, Princess of Poland.1 She married Filippo di Borbone, Duca di Parma, son of Felipe V de Borbón, Rey de España and Isabella Elizabeth Farnese, on 25 October 1739 at Alcalá de Henares, Spain.1 She married Filippo di Borbone, Duca di Parma, son of Felipe V de Borbón, Rey de España and Isabella Elizabeth Farnese, on 26 August 1739 at Versailles, Île-de-France, France, in a proxy marriage.1 She died on 6 December 1759 at age 32 at Versailles, Île-de-France, France.1 She was buried at Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France.1

Children of Louise Elisabeth de Bourbon and Filippo di Borbone, Duca di Parma

Citations

  1. [S36] Page 89. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S36]
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 51. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

Maria Guiseppina Louisa di Savoia, Principessa di Savoia1

F, #105259, b. 2 September 1753, d. 13 November 1810
Last Edited=7 Apr 2012
Consanguinity Index=2.52%
Maria Guiseppina di Savoia
by Elisabeth Lebrun, 1782 2
     Maria Guiseppina Louisa di Savoia, Principessa di Savoia was born on 2 September 1753 at Turin, Italy.1 She was the daughter of Vittorio Amadeo III di Savoia, Re di Sardegna and Maria Antonietta Ferdinanda de Borbón, Infanta de España.3 She married Louis XVIII, Roi de France, son of Louis Ferdinand de Bourbon, Dauphin de France and Marie Josephe Prinzessin von Sachsen, on 14 May 1771 at Versailles, Île-de-France, France.4 She married Louis XVIII, Roi de France, son of Louis Ferdinand de Bourbon, Dauphin de France and Marie Josephe Prinzessin von Sachsen, on 21 April 1771 at Turin, Italy, in a proxy marriage.1 She died on 13 November 1810 at age 57 at Hartwell Castle, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England.1 She was buried at Westminster Abbey, Westminster, London, England.1 She was buried in 1811 at Cagliari Cathedral, Cagliari.1
     She gained the title of Principessa Maria Guiseppina di Savoia.

Citations

  1. [S36] Page 90. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S36]
  2. [S3409] Caroline Maubois, "re: Penancoet Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 2 December 2008. Hereinafter cited as "re: Penancoet Family."
  3. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 121. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.
  4. [S36] See. [S36]

Robert Spencer, 1st Baron Spencer of Wormleighton1

M, #105260, b. 1570, d. 25 October 1627
Last Edited=1 Dec 2008
     Robert Spencer, 1st Baron Spencer of Wormleighton was born in 1570.1 He was the son of Sir John Spencer and Mary Catlin.1 He married Margaret Willoughby, daughter of Sir Francis Willoughby and Elizabeth Lyttelton, on 15 February 1587/88 at Brington, Northamptonshire, England.2 He died on 25 October 1627 at Wormleighton, Warwickshire, England.1 He was buried on 6 November 1627 at Brington, Northamptonshire, England, although his bowels were buried at Wormleighton.2
     He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Brackley from 1597 to 1598.1 He held the office of Commissioner for Musters, Northamptonshire on 19 December 1600.1 He held the office of Sheriff of Northamptonshire from 1601 to 1602.1 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) before 7 October 1601.1 On 25 June 1603 at Althorp, Brington, Northamptonshire, England, he entertained Queen Anne and Prince Henry for two days on their journey from Scotland into England, when The Satyr, a masque by Ben Jonson, was performed for their benefit.1 He was created 1st Baron Spencer of Wormleighton [England] on 21 July 1603, "as he said, for the report of his being the greatest moneyed man in England."1 Between 8 October 1603 and 9 December 1603 he went on a special mission to Stuttgart to invest Frederick, Duke of Wurtemburg with the Garter on 6 Nov 1603.1 He was admitted to Lincoln's Inn on 2 February 1606/7.1
     Cockayne writes that "according to Wilson he 'made the country a virtous court, where his fields and flocks brought him ... calm and happy contentment ... And, when he was called to the senate, was ... vigilant to keep the peoples liberties from being a prey to the encroaching power of monarchy.1' " Cockayne than added that "he is best known for the Earl of Arundel's insulting retort to him in Parliament on 8 May 1621: 'My ancestors have suffered, and it may be for doing the King and the country good service, and in such time as when, perhaps the lord's ancestors that spake last kept sheep.' " He is supposed to have replied that that was when the Earl of Arundel's ancestors were plotting treason (both the Earl's father and grandfather were beheaded for treason).1

Children of Robert Spencer, 1st Baron Spencer of Wormleighton and Margaret Willoughby

Citations

  1. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 159. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
  2. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 160.
  3. [S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume II, page 211. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
  4. [S9] Charles Kidd and David Williamson, editor, DeBretts Peerage and Baronetage (London, U.K.: DeBrett's Peerage, 1999), volume 2, page 1870. Hereinafter cited as DeBretts Peerage, 1999.