Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England1

M, #102421, b. between 942 and 944, d. 8 July 975
Last Edited=11 Dec 2005
     Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England was born between 942 and 944.2 He was the son of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?).3 He married, secondly, Wulfthryth (?).3 He married, firstly, Æthelflæd 'the Fair' (?), daughter of Ordmær, Ealdorman and Ealda (?), between 961 and 962.2 He married, thirdly, Ælfthryth (?), daughter of Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon, between 964 and 965.2 He died on 8 July 975 at Winchester, Hampshire, England.4 He was buried at Glastonbury Abbey, Glastonbury, Somerset, England.4
     He gained the title of King Eadgar of Northumbria and Mercia in 958.1 He succeeded to the title of King Eadgar of England on 1 October 959.1 He was crowned King of England on 11 May 973 at Bath Abbey, Bath, Somerset, England. This ceremony did not occur earlier as St. Dunstan, the Archbishop of Canterbury, would not agree to crown Edgar until he amended his way of life.2
     Edgar was the younger brother of Edwy the previous king. Dunstan, who had been exiled by Edwy, was recalled and appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. Dunstan organised an elaborate coronation for Edgar at Bath and afterwards had a powerful influence on the King. Edgar associated himself closely with the Church and his reign was peaceful and the country was well organised, having a common system of weights, measures and coinage. The courts of justice functioned well and both education and literature flourished. In 973 all the lesser kings, including the Welsh princes, promised allegiance and eight of them made a symbolic gesture by rowing a barge with the King at the helm upon the River Dee. This was a golden era.

Child of Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England and Wulfthryth (?)

Child of Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England and Saint Wulfrida (?)

Child of Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England and Æthelflæd 'the Fair' (?)

Children of Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England and Ælfthryth (?)

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 18. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 19.
  3. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.
  4. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 20.

Ælfthryth (?)1

F, #102422, b. circa 945, d. circa 17 November 1002
Last Edited=4 Dec 2005
     Ælfthryth (?) was born circa 945 at Lydford Castle, Devon, England.2 She was the daughter of Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon. She married, firstly, Æthelwold, Ealdorman of East Anglia, son of Æthelstan, Ealdorman, between 962 and 963.3 She married, secondly, Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England, son of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?), between 964 and 965.2 She died circa 17 November 1002 at Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire, England.3
     She was also known as Alstrita (?).2 She was also known as Elstrudis (?).3 From 11 May 973, her married name became Queen Elfrida of England.3 She was a nun circa 986 at Wherwell Abbey, Hampshire, England.3

Children of Ælfthryth (?) and Æthelwold, Ealdorman of East Anglia

Children of Ælfthryth (?) and Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England

Citations

  1. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 27. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 19. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 20.
  4. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.

Æthelflæd 'the Fair' (?)1

F, #102423, d. between 962 and 964
Last Edited=4 Dec 2005
     Æthelflæd 'the Fair' (?) was the daughter of Ordmær, Ealdorman and Ealda (?).1 She married Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England, son of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?), between 961 and 962.1 She died between 962 and 964.1

Child of Æthelflæd 'the Fair' (?) and Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 19. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.

St. Edward 'the Martyr', King of England1

M, #102424, b. between 962 and 963, d. 18 March 978
Last Edited=11 Dec 2005
     St. Edward 'the Martyr', King of England was born between 962 and 963.1 He was the son of Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England and Æthelflæd 'the Fair' (?).2 He died on 18 March 978 at Corfe Castle, Devon, England, murdered by his step-mother, Queen Elfrida, without issue.3 He was buried at Wareham Abbey, Dorset, England.3 He was buried at Shaftesbury, Dorset, England.4
     He succeeded to the title of King Edward of England on 8 July 975.1 He was crowned King of England in 975 at Kingston-upon-Thames, London, England.1
     Edward the Martyr was Edgar's eldest son but was only about 12 years old when he came to the throne and was crowned by Dunstan. In 976 there was a famine causing great hardship. In 978 the chief councillors of state were assembled on an upper floor of a building in Calne, Wiltshire, when the floor collapsed. All were injured except Dunstan who had been standing on a beam. In the same year Edward decided to visit his step-mother, Elfrida, at Corfe and whilst there she had him murdered so that her son Ethelred would be King. His tomb quickly became a place of pilgrimage. Later, he was made a Saint, the annual celebration being held on March 18th, the anniversary of his death.

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 20. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, page 21.
  4. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 27. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.

Ordmær, Ealdorman1

M, #102425
Last Edited=4 Dec 2005
     Ordmær, Ealdorman married Ealda (?).1
     He gained the title of Ealdorman (?).

Child of Ordmær, Ealdorman and Ealda (?)

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 19. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.


Edmund Atheling (?)1

M, #102426, b. circa 965, d. between 970 and 972
Last Edited=8 Sep 2005
     Edmund Atheling (?) was born circa 965.2 He was the son of Eadgar 'the Peaceful', King of England and Ælfthryth (?).1 He died between 970 and 972.2 He was buried at Romsey Abbey, Romsey, Hampshire, England.2

Citations

  1. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 20. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.

Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon

M, #102427, d. 971
Last Edited=20 Aug 2005
     Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon was born at Devon, England.1 He died in 971 at Devon, England.1
     He gained the title of Ealdorman of Devon.

Child of Ordgar, Ealdorman of Devon

Citations

  1. [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

Eadmund I, King of England1

M, #102428, b. between 920 and 922, d. 26 May 946
Last Edited=7 Feb 2011
Consanguinity Index=0.0%
     Eadmund I, King of England was born between 920 and 922.1 He was the son of Eadweard I, King of Wessex and Eadgifu (?).2 He married, firstly, Ælfgifu (?) circa 940.1 He married, secondly, Æthelflæd (?), daughter of Ælfgar, Ealdorman of the Wilsaetas, circa 946.1 He died on 26 May 946 at Pucklechurch, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England, murdered, by an outlaw named Liofa.1 He was buried at Glastonbury, Somerset, England.
      Eadmund I, King of England also went by the nick-name of Edmund 'the Elder' (?). He succeeded to the title of King Eadmund I of England on 27 October 939.1 He was crowned King of England on 29 November 939 at Kingston-upon-Thames, London, England.1
     Edmund was the half-brother of Athelstan and was only 18 years old on his accession. When Vikings from Ireland invaded, the Archbishop of Canterbury arranged a treaty between them and the English and this divided the country. Later Edmund defeated these Vikings and regained the lost territory. Edmund had allies in the Welsh princes and together they laid waste to Strathclyde. Edmund was warlike and an effective monarch. An interesting story about Edmund concerns Dunstan, who in later years became Archbishop of Canterbury. Edmund and Dunstan were good companions but treacherous courtiers wrongly discredited Dunstan and he was so upset that he contemplated leaving the country he loved so much. Just afterwards, the year was 943, he and Edmund were out riding at Cheddar when Edmund's horse reared up and bolted towards the cliffs of the Gorge. When all seemed lost, the thought struck Edmund of the evil done to Dunstan by the courtiers. He struggled and managed to regain control of his horse and thus avoid the cliffs. He called Dunstan and straightway rode with him to Glastonbury and immediately appointed his good friend as Abbot there.

Children of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?)

Citations

  1. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 16. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  2. [S215] Unknown article title, Journal of the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, Chobham, Surrey, U.K., volume 1, issue 6, page 409. Hereinafter cited as Foundation for Medieval Genealogy.
  3. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.

Ælfgifu (?)1

F, #102429, d. between 944 and 946
Last Edited=4 Dec 2005
     Ælfgifu (?) married Eadmund I, King of England, son of Eadweard I, King of Wessex and Eadgifu (?), circa 940.2 She died between 944 and 946 at Shaftesbury Abbey, Dorset, England.2
     She was also known as Edgira (?).3

Children of Ælfgifu (?) and Eadmund I, King of England

Citations

  1. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 26. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.
  2. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 16. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  3. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.

Eadwig, King of England1

M, #102430, b. between 941 and 943, d. 1 October 959
Last Edited=7 Feb 2011
Eadwig, King of England2
     Eadwig, King of England was born between 941 and 943.3 He was the son of Eadmund I, King of England and Ælfgifu (?).4 He married Ælfgifu (?), daughter of Æthelgifu (?), between 955 and 956.3 He and Ælfgifu (?) were divorced after 956 on the grounds of consanguinity.4 He died on 1 October 959 at Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.3 He was buried at Winchester Cathedral, Winchester, Hampshire, England.3
      Eadwig, King of England also went by the nick-name of Edwy 'the Fair' (?).3 He succeeded to the title of King Eadwig of England on 23 November 955.3 He was crowned King of England circa 26 January 956 at Kingston-upon-Thames, London, England.3
     Eadred, the previous king, had no children and upon his death the elder son, Edwy or Eadwig, of his brother Edmund was chosen as King. Edwy was only 15 years old at the time. In 956 Edwy exiled Dunstan, the previous king's chief minister. Edwy gave land to a number of monasteries including Bampton Church in Oxford and Southwell Minster, York. (A minster was the church of a monastery). Edwy married Elfgifu but this was annulled by order of Archbishop Odo of Canterbury because they were too closely related. Elfgifu was then put to death.

Citations

  1. [S58] E. B. Fryde, D. E. Greenway, S. Porter and I. Roy, editors, Handbook of British Chronology, 3rd edition (London, U.K.: Royal Historical Society, 1986), page 26. Hereinafter cited as Handbook of British Chronology.
  2. [S130] Wikipedia, online http;//www.wikipedia.org. Hereinafter cited as Wikipedia.
  3. [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 18. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Families.
  4. [S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grenville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 4. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.